Conservation
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DNR uses long-term stewardship to conserve and restore the health of our landscapes for the benefit of the people, plants, and animals that live there. Through the use of our conservation programs and plans, DNR gains guidance for maintaining healthy, diverse forest ecosystems while generating income for public schools, state universities, local county services and other beneficiaries of state trust lands.
 

PRESERVING NATURAL LANDSCAPES

At DNR, we maintain valuable information about species and ecosystems as part of our Natural Heritage Program, which helps us identify state-managed lands for natural area preserves and natural resources conservation areas in our Natural Areas Program.
 

BUILDING HEALTHY FORESTS

DNR provides guidance for healthy, productive, and sustainable wildlife and plant habitat across more than 12 million acres of private, public and tribal-owned forestland in Washington state through our Forest Practices program. Our Forest Practices responsibilities include engaging landowners in conservation activities and improving forest health through the Small Forest Landowners Office. This office offers programs to help landowners remove barriers to fish passage in forest streams, conserve critical forest habitat for fish and other species, and access forest management advice from the state's top forestry specialists. DNR also carries out the USDA Forest Service's Forest Legacy Program in Washington state to ensure a continued legacy of forestry on properties that might otherwise be sold for development or converted to other uses. The USDA-funded Washington State Urban and Community Forestry Program, which DNR administers, offers technical advice and other support to communities, tree-care professionals and others who seek to enhance urban forests and the economic, social and other benefits they provide. 
 

RESTORING WATER, CONSERVING CULTURE

In addition to preserving Washington's forestland heritage, DNR offer programs to guide the stewardship of state-owned aquatic lands and to conserve our cultural resources. DNR uses aquatic restoration projects to protect Washington's lakes, rivers, marine waters and estuaries. Through the rules of the state Forest Practices Board, DNR administers rules to help those who work on state-managed and private forestlandsto preserve the cultural resources that reflect the human traditions, culture, and historical artifacts.
 

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

Our State Trust Lands Habitat Conservation Plans provide guidance for DNR's active management and long-term stewardship of state-managed lands for current and future generations.
 

TRANSPARENCY ON ENVIRONMENTAL TOPICS

Our State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) processes provide consistent environmental evaluations with opportunities for public review on DNR projects, actions taking place on DNR-managed state lands, and for activities regulated by DNR on other lands.