DNR adjusts administrative region boundaries in Thurston and Grays Harbor counties
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DNR adjusts administrative region boundaries in Thurston and Grays Harbor counties 
 


NEWS RELEASE                                                                                                          

June 26, 2014

DNR adjusts administrative region boundaries in Thurston and Grays Harbor counties
Capitol State Forest and state trust lands in Thurston County will be managed from region headquarters in Enumclaw starting July 1

OLYMPIA – On July 1, 2014, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will complete an adjustment of boundaries for three of its operational units in Western Washington. Realigning the boundaries of DNR’s Olympic, Pacific Cascade, and South Puget Sound regions will help the agency to better balance staff workloads and improve operational efficiency while preserving the quality of the services its region offices deliver to the public, landowners, and businesses.

“This realignment strengthens our ability to deliver the vital services that Washington citizens expect from DNR,” said Department Supervisor Lenny Young.  

Following the realignment, all state trust lands in Thurston County including Capitol State Forest, as well as the portion of the state forest located in Grays Harbor County will become part of the South Puget Sound Region, headquartered in Enumclaw. The Wynoochee River drainage, east of Aberdeen, will become part of DNR’s Olympic Region, headquartered in Forks.

Because no jobs will be eliminated as a result of the boundary changes and no employees will be asked to relocate, the quality and level of services DNR provides to the public should not be affected in any of those regions. All employees currently assigned within the boundary adjustment areas, including those who maintain recreation lands and provide wildfire response, will continue to report to their usual work areas.

DNR… caring for your natural resources
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR manages more than 5.6 million acres of state-owned forest, range, commercial, agricultural, conservation, and aquatic lands. More than half of these lands are held in trust and produce income to support public schools, universities, prisons, and other state institutions. Lands managed by DNR provide other public benefits, including outdoor recreation, habitat for native fish and wildlife, and watersheds for clean water.

Media Contact: Bob Redling, Senior Communications Manager, 360-902-1149, bob.redling@dnr.wa.gov
 
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 Region map with changes as of July 1, 2014.

DNR Region Boundaries: Dark-shaded areas on the map show the portions of DNR’s Pacific Cascade Region that move to neighboring DNR regions following the July 1, 2014, boundary adjustment.

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