Commissioner Goldmark sends letter of appreciation to U.S. Coast Guard for decision to remove Davy Crockett
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Commissioner Goldmark sends letter of appreciation to U.S. Coast Guard for decision to remove Davy Crockett 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
February 22, 2011
 
Commissioner Goldmark sends letter of appreciation to U.S. Coast Guard for decision to remove Davy Crockett
The 441-foot barge will be safely dismantled and toxins disposed

OLYMPIA - The derelict barge, known as the “Davy Crockett,” will be appropriately removed by the U.S. Coast Guard from the Columbia River. The vessel is in trespass of state-owned aquatic lands and has been reported to have various toxins aboard and is falling apart. The Coast Guard is developing a plan to dismantle the barge in portions and dispose of toxins off-site, to ensure the river stays clean.

“We are grateful to the U.S. Coast Guard in its decision to use the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund to remove and dismantle the derelict barge Davy Crockett that currently lies in trespass on state-owned aquatic lands,” said Commissioner Goldmark. “The only way to ensure public health and safety is to fully remove the vessel.”

The DNR Derelict Vessel Removal Program (DVRP) is limited to removing vessels of 200 feet or smaller and has a two-year budget of $1.7 million. Large derelict vessels such as the Davey Crockett would overwhelm the current state program without the assistance of the federal government.

DNR Steward of state aquatic lands
As steward of more than 2.6 million acres of state-owned aquatic lands, DNR manages the bedlands under Puget Sound, the coast, many of Washington’s beaches, and natural lakes and navigable rivers. DNR manages these lands not only to facilitate navigation, commerce, and public access, but also to ensure protection of aquatic habitats. State-owned aquatic lands include:

  • About 68,100 acres of state-owned tidelands, or 106 square miles
  • 90,000 acres of harbor areas
  • All submerged marine lands below extreme low tide—that’s 3,430 square miles of bedlands under navigable waters, as well as freshwater shorelands and bedlands

Peter Goldmark, who administers the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, is Washington’s 13th Commissioner of Public Lands since statehood in 1889.

Media Contact: Bryan Flint, DNR Communications and Outreach Director,  360-902-1023, bryan.flint@dnr.wa.gov

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DNR Communications & Outreach Office
360-902-1016
dnrnews@dnr.wa.gov

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