Funds still available to help small forest landowners remove stream blockages
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Funds still available to help small forest landowners remove stream blockages 
 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
May 25, 2010

Funds still available to help small forest landowners remove stream blockages
June 30 is the deadline to apply for funding to replace road culverts that are blocking fish in streams

OLYMPIA – The Family Forest Fish Passage Program is accepting applications until June 30, 2010, for funds to help small forest landowners replace culverts that block fish in streams crossing their land. The deadline is for the program’s current funding cycle.

Since 2003, the program has helped more than 165 landowners correct 198 barriers that blocked fish passage in streams. The removals have reconnected about 450 miles of fish habitat around the state.

The program pays from 75 percent to 100 percent of the cost to remove these barriers. Successful applicants must be small forest landowners with a forest road that crosses a fish-bearing stream on their land. Qualifying projects can include the removal of undersized or elevated culverts, log puncheons, or collapsed culverts.

Projects are ranked based on the habitat affected, its location in the watershed and a cost-benefit analysis. Landowners enrolled in the program receive funding based on the ranking and as funds become available. The program contracts with local conservation groups to manage the projects.  

More information about the program is online at www.dnr.wa.gov. The direct link to the Family Forest Fish Passage Program is: http://www.dnr.wa.gov/BusinessPermits/Topics/SmallForestLandownerOffice/Pages/fp_sflo_fffpp.aspx.  

The Family Forest Fish Passage Program is administered by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Recreation Conservation Office and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife.

DNR–managing and protecting your natural resources
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR manages 2.9 million acres of state-owned trust lands, 2.6 million acres of aquatic lands and a statewide Natural Areas Program that protects lands that feature native ecosystems. DNR also protects about 12.7 million acres of tribal, private, and state lands from wildfire, and is responsible for implementing Forest Practices regulations and regulating surface mining.

Peter Goldmark is Washington’s 13th Lands Commissioner since statehood in 1889.

Media Contact: Bob Redling, Senior Communications Manager, 360-902-1149, bob.redling@dnr.wa.gov  

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