Timber harvest in Klickitat Meadows means heavy truck traffic in Ahtanum State Forest
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Timber harvest in Klickitat Meadows means heavy truck traffic in Ahtanum State Forest 
 


For Immediate Release
                                                                                                         
July 8, 2009
 
Timber harvest in Klickitat Meadows means heavy truck traffic in Ahtanum State Forest
DNR urges visitors to use extreme caution

OLYMPIA –The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) advises outdoor recreationists heading to Ahtanum State Forest to be aware of heavy truck traffic as a result of timber harvest activity beginning July13.

The timber harvesting is taking place in the  Klickitat Meadows in the western part of Ahtanum State Forest. Visitors can expect anywhere from 30 to 40 trucks or chip vans each day—Monday through Saturday—to be rolling through Tree Phones Campground along the Middle Fork Ahtanum Road to Tampico. The Ahtanum State Forest is 30 miles west of Yakima.

In addition, an adjacent private landowner may harvest some timber starting later this month, which may add an additional 20 to 30 trucks per day.

“Safety is our first concern. We’ll be monitoring the situation closely to see how well trucks and visitors interact,” said Ken McNamee, manager of DNR’s Alpine District. “We’re asking everyone to be patient and work with each other, and to allow extra time to get to where they want to go in Ahtanum.”

McNamee said the timber harvest will continue at least through the end of October or until weather forces the harvest to come to an end.

For more information, contact Ken McNamee, DNR’s Southeast Region Alpine District manager, 509-925-0937 (office); 509-899-2883 (mobile); or ken.mcnamee@dnr.wa.gov .

Recreation on DNR-managed lands
DNR manages more than 5 million acres of state-owned forest, aquatic, agricultural, conservation and urban lands. Most recreation on these lands takes place in the 2.1 million acres of forests that DNR manages as state trust lands. By law, DNR manages state trust lands to produce income for schools, universities, prisons, state mental hospitals, community colleges, local services in many counties, and the state’s general fund. State trust lands are also managed to provide fish and wildlife habitat and educational and recreational opportunities.

DNR-managed lands provide a variety of landscapes throughout Washington State. Recreational opportunities include hiking, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, camping, motorized vehicle riding, mountain biking, and boating.

DNR’s main recreation focus is to provide trails, trailhead facilities, and a primitive experience in a natural setting.

Media Contact: Toni Droscher, Communications and Outreach Specialist, 360-485-3406 (mobile), and toni.droscher@dnr.wa.gov

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