Road work begins in Burnt Hill near Sequim
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Road work begins in Burnt Hill near Sequim  
 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
June 18, 2009

Road work begins in Burnt Hill near Sequim
DNR urges ORV riders in the area to exercise extreme caution

OLYMPIA – A timber sale is underway in a portion of the Burnt Hill area south of Sequim, and recreationists are urged to be especially cautious, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced today.

Burnt Hill is a popular area on the Olympic Peninsula for recreation, particularly off-road vehicle (ORV) riding and target shooting. For years, there has been very little timber management activity, so the road work operations may come as a surprise for recreationists.

This week, crews will be moving large equipment into the area and will begin working on the J-2000 and the J-2200 roads in the north central part of Burnt Hill. Work will include brushing, ditching, and installing 50 new culverts. Timber harvest will begin later this summer and will continue through next summer, with a break during the winter months.

Portions of the J-2000 and J-2200 roads may be gated and locked by the contractor as needed during the operations. DNR and contractor crews will be placing signs in appropriate areas.

Work will also take place periodically in the gravel pit. During these times, the pit will be closed to target shooting.

Recreation on DNR-managed lands
DNR manages more than 5 million acres of state-owned forest, aquatic, agricultural, conservation and urban lands. Most recreation on these lands takes place in the 2.2 million acres of forests that DNR manages as state trust lands. By law, state trust lands are managed to produce income for schools, universities, prisons, state mental hospitals, community colleges, local services in many counties, and the state’s general fund. State trust lands are also managed to provide fish and wildlife habitat and educational and recreational opportunities.

DNR-managed lands provide 1,100 miles of trails, 143 recreation sites, and a variety of landscapes throughout Washington State. Recreational opportunities include hiking, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, camping, motorized vehicle riding, mountain biking, and boating.

DNR’s main recreation focus is to provide trails, trailhead facilities, and a primitive experience in a natural setting.


Media Contact: Toni Droscher, communications and outreach specialist, 360-485-3406 (mobile), 360-902-1523 (office), toni.droscher@dnr.wa.gov

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