Arbor Day Foundation supports tree planting on state land
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Arbor Day Foundation supports tree planting on state land 
 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
April 30, 2010
 
Arbor Day Foundation supports tree planting on state land
Grant pays for reforestation projects to create healthier state forests

OLYMPIA –Today is National Arbor Day, and while Washington State officially recognizes Arbor Day on the second Wednesday in April, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources celebrates the tree planting holiday throughout the entire month.

Thanks to a grant from the Arbor Day Foundation, DNR’s Northwest Region will help create healthier forests through reforestation projects on state land. The grant will fund 103,780 western red cedar seedlings.

The Arbor Day Foundation works in partnership with the National Association of State Foresters to identify reforestation projects that help support healthy state forests. Forests that are recovering from fire, storms, disease, and insect damage are candidates for assistance with reforestation costs. By covering the cost of western redcedar seedlings, the Arbor Day Foundation will help DNR ensure future trust beneficiaries the highest level of value and ecological function from state forests now and into the future.

DNR strives to maintain forests where species diversity is present. Traditional forestry in Washington State has created very large areas of Douglas fir plantations. While Douglas fir is a very important and valuable tree, DNR also has been planting other species to help maintain diversity across the landscape.

One of the most important species planted is western red cedar. This species has maintained high value over time and provides a wealth of ecological benefits, including the creation of long lasting snags and down woody debris on which many animal species depend. This also is a tree of significant cultural value to Northwest Native American tribes.

DNR manages certain lands, held in trust, for the benefit of the citizens of Washington. These lands generate revenue which is allocated to designated trust beneficiaries, such as school construction or county governments. DNR also works closely with citizen groups, stakeholders, and area Native American tribes to try and balance the economic, social, and environmental concerns that are inherent in land management. 

For more information on the approved funding from the Arbor Day Foundation or more information associated with the project, please contact Chris Hankey, DNR’s Northwest Region Silviculturist, at 360-854-2811 or chris.hankey@dnr.wa.gov .

Media Contact: Janet Pearce, Outreach and Education, 360-902-1122, janet.pearce@dnr.wa.gov .  

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