Board of Natural Resources approves new conservation area in east Pierce County that protects old-growth forest
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Board of Natural Resources approves new conservation area in east Pierce County that protects old-growth forest 
 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
September 4, 2012

Board of Natural Resources approves new conservation area in east Pierce County that protects old-growth forest
Purchase of working forest in King County helps protect Seattle drinking water

OLYMPIA – At its regular monthly meeting today, the state Board of Natural Resources approved the transfer into conservation status of 78 acres of unique forestland bordering the Glacier View Wilderness area in eastern Pierce County. The parcel of state trust land is two miles northeast of the town of Ashford and includes old-growth forest between 400 and 600 years old that survived a wildfire several hundred years ago.

Funding for this transfer comes from the state’s Trust Land Transfer Program which provides a legislatively appropriated $1.1 million deposit—the value of the parcel’s timber—into the state’s public school construction account. The value of the land in the transfer, about $50,000, will be used to buy more productive forestland for the Common School trust, which supports public school construction statewide.

DNR transfers lands into conservation status as Natural Resources Conservation Areas (NRCAs) when it is desirable to protect native plants and ecosystems. NRCAs are open to many low-impact activities such as hiking, bird watching or wildflower viewing.

King County forestland acquisition
The Board also approved a $142,500 purchase offer for 150 acres of working forestland located 11 miles east of Maple Valley in King County. The acquisition will provide DNR better access to working forest it manages on adjacent state trust land while replacing less-productive Common School Trust properties that were previously transferred to other uses. The proposed purchase would include a development easement to prevent housing development and associated traffic in the area from making an impact on the Cedar River Watershed and the City of Seattle’s drinking water.

DNR manages state trust lands
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR manages more than 5.6 million acres of state-owned lands. Of these, more than half are state trust lands in forest, agriculture, wind energy and other production to earn income to support the state’s public schools, universities, prisons, and other institutions. In addition to revenue, DNR manages these lands to provide habitat for native fish and wildlife, clean water, outdoor recreation, and other public benefits. The Board of Natural Resources represents the beneficiaries of state trust lands.

Media Contact: Bob Redling, Senior Communications Manager, 360-902-1149, bob.redling@dnr.wa.gov  

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