State Board of Natural Resources approves Cherry Creek forestland acquisition in King County
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State Board of Natural Resources approves Cherry Creek forestland acquisition in King County 
 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                                                                                         
February 2, 2010

State Board of Natural Resources approves Cherry Creek forestland acquisition in King County
King County, DNR and state grant purchase will protect wetlands, keep private parcel near Duvall from development

OLYMPIA – The state Board of Natural Resources today approved the acquisition of a 54-acre parcel of forestland east of Duvall for the Common School Trust. The property, which is to be sold by a private party, is an in-holding surrounded by thousands of acres of state trust forestland known as Marckworth State Forest. Because of its rural-residential potential and county road access, the tract along Cherry Creek was at high risk of being converted from working forest into home sites.

The purchase was financed through the combined efforts of King County, the state Recreation and Conservation Office, and Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

“This partnership of like-minded organizations has produced an outcome that will protect more of the habitat, wetlands, clean water and open spaces of eastern King County,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark.

DNR will manage about 28 acres of the site as working forest and the remaining 26 acres as a riparian (streamside) conservation area to protect several acres of wetlands and nearby Cherry Creek.

“Cherry Creek adjoins several acres of wonderful wetland, and this purchase will provide protection for some important salmon habitat in the Snoqualmie watershed,” said King County Executive Dow Constantine. “This acquisition also helps us retain working forests, tie together fragmented forest landscapes and improve forest sustainability.”

“The Cascade Land Conservancy applauds the leadership of the Department of Natural Resources and King County and the property owners in the conservation of this treasured 54-acre forest,” said Gene Duvernoy, President, Cascade Land Conservancy. “The Conservancy has worked for several years with all parties to achieve this goal. This is a great example of cooperation between government agencies, land trusts and private landowners that results in significant conservation for everyone.”

In the agreement negotiated with the private seller by the Cascade Land Conservancy, the Common School Trust will pay $158,000 for the forestland value. The additional development value of $522,000 of the parcel will be paid by King County and a grant from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program (WWRP), which is funded by legislative appropriation and managed by the Recreation and Conservation Office.

Skagit County Trust Land Transfer
In another action, the board approved a transfer of 40 acres of state trust land to Seattle City Light through the state’s Trust Land Transfer (TLT) Program. The 40-acre parcel is a mile south of Marblemount. The TLT program reimburses the Common School Trust through legislative appropriation for lands transferred to other public agencies for open space, wildlife habitat, or recreation.

The transfer to the utility company was made possible by an ‘inter-grant exchange’ of parcels between state trusts in Skagit County: approximately 70 acres of Common School Trust land was exchanged for about 40 acres of State Forest Transfer Trust land. Appraisals indicate that the parcels are of equal value.

DNR manages state trust lands
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR manages more than 5.6 million acres of state-owned forest, range, commercial, agricultural, conservation, and aquatic lands. More than half of these lands are held in trust and produce income to support public schools, universities, prisons, and other state institutions. Lands managed by DNR provide other public benefits as well, including outdoor recreation, native fish and wildlife habitat, and clean and abundant water.

Media Contact: Bob Redling, Senior Communications Manager, 360-902-1149, bob.redling@dnr.wa.gov  

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